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Poster: RBNW....new and improved! Date: Nov 26, 2011 5:56am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: who started this trend...?

Of playing whole albums.... the Dead, Steely Dan, Pink Floyd(Roger Waters) and Phish....to name a few have done this and now the Allman Brothers. The are to play Fillmore East and Eat a Peach at upcoming Orpheum shows in Boston.

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Nov 29, 2011 2:23pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: who started this trend...?

First, isn't covering your own live album kinda like DSO-ing yourself?

insyncornucopia said:
"the Who performing Tommy might have been the first, but certainly Pink Floyd with DSOTM"

I think you're spot on, though, I had no idea that The Who even played any Tommy songs at Leeds until they started releasing Live at Leeds Deluxe and Live at Leeds Supah-deluxe, etc.

Floyd was playing DSOTM as whole before the album even came out. I listened to the show the other day where they first attempted DSOTM and they had to abandon it less than halfway thru because of technical difficulties with all the non-instrument electronics the album required. Here it is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtg8KzoBBmA&;feature=related
I know they did some shows where they played WYWH all the way through, then DSOTM all the way through, and maybe Echoes for an encore.

My favorites are from the Animals Tour and right before that when they were Ravin' and Droolin' and Gotta be Crazy.

Enjoy,
Judge TOOTMO

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Poster: portmcgroin Date: Nov 26, 2011 8:42am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: who started this trend...?

The Pink Floyd pulse tour was the first that I remember back in the mid 90s a bunch of us rented it on pay per view. They played Darkside of the Moon. With the Allmans it seems like they still play those songs from the Fillmore and Eat a Peach so why would I care what order there in. I think that concept works better with studio albums than live albums.

This post was modified by portmcgroin on 2011-11-26 16:42:26

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Poster: leftwinger57 Date: Nov 26, 2011 11:05am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: who started this trend...?

I'm going to have to agree w/ you on this one .As I remember it Pink Floyd at Roosevelt Stadium did a whole 1st set of everything prior to DSM and then they did the entire album w/ the plane appearing to crash into the stage ,light towers that were basically camouflaged scissor lifts going up and down and all the smoke machines in the universe, talk about specticle I usually like my shows just music and some lights for atmosphere but this really did work.The 94 Yankee stadium show for the finally of Comfortably Numb had this arm that raised up in the middle of the field opened like a flower to reveal the fucking biggest mirrored ball I'd had ever seen, they focused about 10 computer controlled super spots on this and they started to rotate that sucker I was holding on to the hand rails ,a true special effect.

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Poster: rdenirojb87 Date: Nov 26, 2011 7:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: who started this trend...?

the who has done it for some time. they will be performing quadrophenia in full during 2012. not sure who got the ball rolling.

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Poster: Edsel Date: Nov 26, 2011 8:53am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: who started this trend...?

I recall Jethro Tull playing the entire Thick As A Brick album at a show in the 70's. They played their first set, said "what do you wanna hear next ?" and popped out the entire album.

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Poster: Incornsyucopia Date: Nov 26, 2011 9:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: who started this trend...?

I think this became pretty common with the onset of progressive rock concept albums, in which each song is understood as only part of a larger whole. So yes, the Who performing Tommy might have been the first, but certainly Pink Floyd with DSOTM, Yes with Tales from Topographic Oceans and Genesis' The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway in 1972-75. About the Lamb tour, I seem to remember an interview with Phil Collins or Tony Banks about how tired they got playing the same songs night after night with only the encore song changing.

I definitely think that one of the reasons that the Dead lasted as long as they did, was that though they played some songs pretty frequently at points, overall their set-lists always remained very fluid. Thankfully for us!